Social Responsibility of Politics and Social Media

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Capturing my vote 

With regard to capturing my vote, telling me everything the President is doing wrong or has done wrong, in your opinion, doesn’t work. If you want me to vote for your candidate, then tell me all the great things your candidate is doing. This is what’s missing from Facebook and most “news” outlets. What I want to know is, what are the candidates doing right?

I already know the conservatives hate the liberals and blame them for every single problem our country faces, has faced, and will face. I also know the liberals hate the conservatives and blame them for ever single problem our country faces, has faced, and will face. See the problem?

On Facebook I know what everyone disapproves of but I rarely get to see what they like, what glowing awesomeness their candidate has accomplished, how their candidate has led by example, and what their candidate’s game plan is for more awesomeness. Also, for the record, if you want me to check out your candidate don’t post an article from an ultra left wing or right wing website. I’ll skip it.

I have opinions too and an agenda. Everyone does but slinging hate towards politicians and our President, some of which would be considered verbally abusive if people were face to face,  accomplishes nothing except attracting more like minded people who get together and rant about every problem under the sun, then turn off Facebook and go back to their day jobs.

Oh right, our day jobs!

Let’s mix that in with politics and Facebook. Politics strikes deep. When posts go up for all to see, you are understandably posting your opinion and views, but keep in mind you are also posting those views to your boss, your clients, your customers, and your employees. The good news, this could lead to a healthy debate about how we can all work together for a better world. The bad news, it probably won’t.

It will most likely lead to animosity. For every boss, employee, client, or customer you find who shares your views, there’s one who doesn’t. Politics used to stay at the dinner table or along social groups but with Facebook everyone you’re hooked up with gets to see everything you post.  Most likely your close friends share the same views and will back you up, but there is a big world out there that shouldn’t be taken for granted.

If you are trying to make the big sale or land the new promotion, don’t you wonder if your recent political rant on Facebook may strike a negative chord?

All in all, I’m not a fan of politics. There’s a lot of wheeling and dealing that goes on which I’m too naïve and too distracted to even want to know about. There are things politicians and the President deal with on a daily basis that I can’t even begin to know or understand.

I’d like to walk into our next Presidential election doing my homework through news outlets, that in some way shape or form, actually post what happened and not someone’s opinion on the matter. I’ll watch the debates, fact check where I can, see what issues they voted on or didn’t vote on, and try to read up on what they’ve accomplished.

Part 2 of 2 will focus on Insights as an independent and Small Business Insights

Related articles:

Sid Espinosa, National, Local and Philanthropic

Five Insights on the State of Immigration, Politics and Business 

Small Business Social Media: It’s All About Word of Mouth

Lynmarie McCullough
Lynmarie McCullough
Lynmarie McCullough was born and raised in New Jersey and is a graduate of the University of Maryland. She’s a seasoned production coordinator, having worked with VH1 / MTV Networks, SONY Electronics and various production companies. She wrote and produced a short in 2009, which was shown at the Wake Forest Film Festival. She published her first children's book, The Grand Hall Character Ball, in 2010, and in 2011 co-authored, Marshall & Planet Saurus with her seven year-old son. The books are available on their website, www.mcculloughbooks.com, where her son hosts videos as well.

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